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Chamberlayne, Thomas

Male Abt 1568 - 1640


Personal Information    |    Notes    |    All    |    PDF

  • Born  Abt 1568  Prestbury, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender  Male 
    Buried  4 Dec 1640  Oddington, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID  I04817  My Genealogy
    Last Modified  10 Nov 2017 

    Father  Chamberlayne, Thomas,   b. Abt 1510, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   bur. 26 Jul 1580, Prestbury, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother  Carkyke, Anne,   b. Abt 1528, Of Potheridge, Devon, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1580-1588, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  Abt 1567  London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID  F01079  Group Sheet

    Family  Bagehott, Margaret,   b. Abt 1580, Of Prestbury, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1616, Oddington, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  Abt 1595  England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Chamberlayne, John
     2. Chamberlayne, Leonard,   d. Aft 1640
     3. Chamberlayne, George
     4. Chamberlayne, Ann
     5. Chamberlayne, Margaret
     6. Chamberlayne, Francis
     7. Chamberlayne, Elizabeth
    >8. Chamberlayne, Thomas,   b. Abt 1599, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   bur. 17 May 1689, Oddington, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
    >9. Chamberlayne, Mary,   b. Abt 1611, Of Oddington, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aug 1684, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
     10. Chamberlayne, Edward,   c. 13 Dec 1616, Oddington, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 May 1703, Chelsea, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location
    Family ID  F02115  Group Sheet

  • Notes 
    • Will of Thomas Chamberlaine of Oddington, Gloucestershire 20 February 1641 PROB 11/185
      Gloucestershire County Council
      FindingRef GDR/100/page 619 Title Case: Henry Chamberlaine, clerk, Rector of Oddington v Thomas Gamond, clerk, Rector of the same: Institution as rector [Benefice], 16 & 18 July 1608 Date 1608 Description Deponents: Sir John Chamberleyne, knight, of Prestbury. Aged 46 or 47.
      Thomas Chamberlayne, gentleman, of Oddington. Lived there 20 years. Born Prestbury. Aged 39.
      Bartholomew Smithe, servant to Sir John Chamberlaine of Prestbury. Lived there 5 years. Born Wells, Som. Aged 27.
      Francis Gardner, servant to Sir John Chamberleyne of Prestbury. Lived there 12 years. Born Adlestrop. Aged 38.
      On the part of Henry Chamberleyne

      Depositions (abstract):
      Sir John Chamberleyne (Chamblayne) said that Thomas Gamond, in the life time of his late master, Mr Cleyton, entreated Mr Cleyton and some of Chamberleyne's friends that he might be presented at the next vacancy to the Rectory of Oddington which belonged to Chamberleyne. Four or five days before he died, in the presence of Mr Gamond, Mr Cleyton entreated Chamberleyne to present Gamond to the Rectory of Oddington and promised that Gamond would hold the Rectory on the same terms as he had which was 40 yearly to be paid to Chamberleyne. The Rectory is worth 80 per annum. Chamberleyne promised to present Gamond and did so. Mr Cleyton died about May 1607. He knows that Gamond was suitor to his brother, Thomas Chamberlen, gentleman, to present Gamond to the Rectory on the same terms. His brother signified as much to him by letters and otherwise. In the end Chamberleyne did present Gamond who promised to seal and deliver a lease to Chamberleyne of all the profits and emoluments of the Rectory at a rent of 40 per annum. The lease was made ready to be sealed but Gamond did not seal it. Francis Garner told him that Gamond promised him that he would accept 40 for the Rectory and although some had told him that when he was in possession of the benefice he might keep it wholly to himself he would not but would be contented with 40 in lieu of all the tithes. Since he was inducted Gamond confessed to Chamberleyne that he endeavoured to get the King's Majesty's pardon for committing simony in obtaining the Rectory and had been with the Bishop of Gloucester to get his Lordship's hand to further that business but could not get it and the pardon could not do him good without his Lordship's hand. Francis Garner, one of Chamberleyne's servants, told him that since his induction Gamond wished him to gather all the tithes that were due for the use only of Chamberleyne and that he expected no more than 40. Shortly after the death of Cleyton Chamberlayne went to Mr Denis Drurye with a letter from Cleyton entreating his help to procure the Rectory for Gamond. Chamberlayne cannot remember whether he said he would bestow the Rectory on Gamond freely or not. After he had procured the Bishop of Gloucester's fiat for Gamond's induction he remembers saying to him, " Now, Mr parson, you see how kindly I have dealt with you I hope you will perform the promise you and your master made me." He never had speech with Mr Jones of the Star Chamber nor told him he had bestowed the Rectory freely. When there were differences between them Gamond procured Mr Greenewood to confer with him and he told him that he would do well to cause Mr Gamond to make an end with him. He was in London when Cleyton died. Gamond came to London and promised to accept 40 per annum if he was presented to the Rectory. Since Gamond was inducted Chamberlayne has had the tithes belonging to the Rectory for his own use. He has confessed that Gamond had committed simony with him, Chamberlayne. In his last sickness Cleyton earnestly requested him, as ever there had been kindness between them, to be good unto that poor soul, Mr Gamond, after his decease and he would pawn his soul that Gamond would deal as bountifully with Chamberlayne as he had done. This was said in the presence of Mr Thomas Chamberleyne, the younger, Mr Stephen Porter, Bartholomew Smithe and Francis Garner.
      Thomas Chamberlayne said that Henry Cleyton often asked him to be a means to Sir John, his brother, to present Thomas Gamond after Cleyton's death and he promised he would. When Cleyton was in his last sickness he went to his brother and asked him to visit Cleyton which he did. Thomas Chamberleyne's account of the conversation with Cleyton and who witnessed it agrees with Sir John's. After Cleyton's death Gamond visited Thomas Chamberlayne and said he would accept the Rectory for 40 per annum and would make a lease of all the tithes to Sir John. Thomas told him that Mr Cleyton had had a room in the parsonage house at Oddington but that Gamond would not and Gamond said he was content. He wrote a letter for Gamond to give to Sir John entreating him to present Gamond to the Rectory. Before Gamond went to London he questioned Thomas as to how he might avoid simony because he had promised to make a lease and how he might avoid taking the oath that he had committed no acts of simony in obtaining the Rectory. Thomas said he should acquaint Sir John with this and he would direct him what to do. After Gamond was inducted he told Thomas he had sought to procure the King's Majesty's pardon but had not obtained it. Gamond had brought the letter dated 19 June 1607 mentioned in this article to him unsealed and asked him to read it then seal it and convey it to Sir John which he did. As for the contents he refers himself to the letter itself. He has heard Sir John say that he had committed simony with Gamond. Thomas has told some parishioners that there was another clerk presented to the Rectory by the King's Majesty and therefore he wished them to detain their tithes until it was sure who should enjoy the place. Mr Henry Chamberlayne, the plaintiff, caused him to go to Mr Penny, his proctor, and tell him what he could say on this business.
      Bartholomew Smithe (Smythe) agreed with other accounts of Cleyton's sickbed. As Sir John's steward, Smithe has received an account from Francis Gardner concerning the tithes of the Rectory received by Sir John since Gamond's induction.
      Francis Gardner thinks the Rectory of Oddington is worth about 100 per annum. In the lifetime of Cleyton Gamond had asked Gardner to speak to Sir John that he might have the rectory after Cleyton's death and he had done so. After Gamond's induction Mr Tidmarshe told him he might take possession of the tithes for the use of Sir John. He believes Sir John did not intend to bestow the rectory freely on Gamond. By order of Sir John he had openly told parishioners not to pay tithes to Gamond because they were at difference about the tithes. Sir John is his master and is indebted to Gardner for above 20. He offered to lay a wager of 10 to 10 shillings that Gamond would not keep the parsonage. He and Thomas Chamberleyne had gone together to Mr Penny, proctor for Henry Chamberleyne, and told him what they would say and gave him instructions. Level Piece HeldAt Gloucestershire Archives

      Will of Thomas Chamberlaine of Oddington, Gloucestershire 20 February 1641 PROB 11/185

      3 [THOMAS - CHAMBERLAYNE (Thomas ') of Oddington, two miles
      east of Stow. In 1608 he was "a subsidy man," was lord of this manor, and had four servants "fit for His Majesty's service in the Wars." His tombstone, in the chancel of the church at Oddington, reads: "Here lyeth the body of Thomas Chamberlayne, Esqr., descended from ye Earles of Tancrevile, High Chamberlaynes
      of Normandy. He was third son of Sir Thomas Chamberlayne of Prestbury, in the County of GIouc. Knight, Ambassadour from Hen. 8, Edw. 6, Q. Mary, and Q. Elizabeth, to ye Q. of Hungary, to ye K. of Sweden, and to ye K. of Portugal, and to Phillip ye 2d King of Spaine. He marryed Margaret, daughter and heyre of Edward Bagehott, of Prestbury aforesaid, Gent., who also lies interred here. By her he left five sons, Thomas, John, Leonard, George, and Edward, and 5 daughters Ann, Margaret, Mary, Frances, and Elizabeth. He dyed ye 4th of Deer. 1640, aged 72. This Monument was erected at ye cost and charges of John Chamberlane, M. Art. and Med. Proyfessor." (Bigland.)

      Sons:
      1. Thomas,^ b. Dec, 1599. His tombstone in the chancel at Oddington reads: "Here lyeth the body of Thomas Chamberlayne, Esqr., born in December, 1599, died the 17 of May, 1689, eldest son of Thomas Chamberlayne, buried hereby. Here lyeth the body of Katherine only daughter of Robert Brent, Esqr., and only wife of Thomas Chamberlayne, here near interred. She was born 1610, married 1630, and died 26 Oct., 1683."
      (Bigland.) His will, made in 1687, mentions two sons, Thomas and Robert, as then living; the daughter of his son John, deceased, and two children of his son Thomas; also six daughters. An abstract of his will is given below among the Abstracts from the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, which follow this pedigree.

      ii JOHN.3

      iii Leonard.^
      iv Geokge.3

      V Edward,^ b. at Oddington, Dec. 13, 1616; d. at Chelsea, near London, May, 1703. He entered St. Edmund Hall, Oxford, at Michaelmas, 1634; received the degree of B.A. April 20, 1638; M.A. March 6, 1641; LL.D., at Cambridge, Jan., 1670-71; D.C.L., at
      Cxford, 1672. "He was one of the original members of the Royal Society." Among other books, he was the author of Angliae Notitiae, or the Present State of England. This handbook, first published in 1669, passed through twenty editions during his lifetime. He m. in 1658 Susannah, daughter of Richard Clifford, and had nine children.
      She d. Dec. 17, 1703. John * (1666-1723), son of Edward,^ continued his father's literary work. "According to contemporary report, he knew sixteen languages." He was a fellow of the Royal Society in 1702, and was the author of many books. Biog-
      raphies of both father and son appear in the Dictionary of National Biography, edited by Leslie Stephen. Atkyns (p. 308) wrote about 1700: "Thomas Chamberlain, esq., is the present lord of the manor [of Oddington], who has a seat here, and an estate in this and other places. . . . John Chamberlayn, of Westminster, esq., is the heir
      male of this branch of the family: he is likewise the heir, by his mother, of the ancient family of the Cliffords of Frampton upon Severn, in this county: he is the author of that most useful publick book, 'The Present State of England'; and has many ways dis-
      tinguished himself by his great application to the publick service of his country."]