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Notes


Matches 3951 to 3955 of 3955

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   Notes   Linked to 
3951 Robert Young, son and heir of Sir John, was born on 1st July, 1570. His grandfather John Wadham, the father of Dame Joan, his mother, in his will dated 1st April, 1577, mentions all the children of "my son Sir John Yonge,"- Robert, Jane, and Margaret Younge.
On attaining the age of 21 years in 1591, he proved his father's will, and afterwards entered into possession of his father's real estates, except the Manor of Hazelbury and the Advowson of the Rectory of Abbotsbury, which Sir John in his will states he had purchased to his wife in redemption of her jointure, and which Sir Robert inherited after his mother's death.
When knighted in April 1604 he was living in Somersetshire. Earlier he was of Haselbury, Wiltshire. Robert Younge's lifestyle was dissolute and resulted in him mortgaging family property in the 1590s and being forced to sell it in 1603.
He may have been twice married.
His half-sister, Ann Bridgman, of Badminton Magna, Gloucester, widow, nee Strangwayes, in her will dated 10 th February, 1606, names "Elizabeth Young, daughter of Sir Robert Young by his first wife." She also names Peregrine Young, son of my brother, Sir Robert Young, and also Nicholas Young, son of Sir Robert Young. This difference of description between Elizabeth and her brothers seems to imply children by differnt mothers.

No will of him, nor of his sons Nicholas or Peregrine have been found to date. Peregrine Young, son of Sir Robert, married Theophila, daughter of John Butcher, or Bowcher, Alderman of Bristol, and widow of a Thrupp. He is named in the will of John Bowcher in 1620.


National Archives [no title] 5535/6 1595 May 15 Contents:
Demise for 40 years by way of Mortgage for £100. - Robert Younge of Haselbury (Wilts.)., esq., to William Winter of Bristol, esq.- messuage lately built by Sir John Younge commonly called the lodge on Mighell Hill.
[no title] 5535/8 1599 March 26 Contents:
Mortgage for £120 subject to demise in (6) - Robert Younge of Haselbury, Wilts., esq., to Thomas Arthur of Bristol, gent. - Redd Lodge in the parish of St. Michael lately built by Sir John Younge, dec'd., and all grounds belonging excepting one garden sold to George Whyte.

[no title] 5535/10 1599 March 28 Contents: Bargain & Sale, subject to demise in (6) - Robert Younge and Thomas Arthur to Nicholas Strangwayes of Bradley, Glos., esq. - premises as in (8). Consideration: £100

?
Will of Thomas Yong or Yonge, Merchant of Bristol, Gloucestershire 12 August 1628 PROB 11/154
 
Younge, Robert
 
3952 Left will dated 1579.
Can not be this old at time of death? Talks about his mother in law and unmarried children in his will?? Second marriage?? 
Younger, Richard Richmond the
 
3953 Will of Sir John Zouche 12 June 1585 PROB 11/68
 
Zouche, John
 
3954 From www.oxford-shakespeare.com/Probate/PRO

SUMMARY: The document below is the Prerogative Court of Canterbury copy of the will, dated 1 August 1541 and proved 22 July 1544, of Elizabeth (nee Scrope) Peche, first cousin of Elizabeth (nee Scrope) Beaumont de Vere (d.1537), Countess of Oxford, second wife of John de Vere (1442-1513), 13th Earl of Oxford. The testatrix was born Elizabeth Scrope, the daughter and co-heir of Robert Scrope, the third son of Henry Scrope (1418-1458/9), 4th Baron Scrope of Bolton, and his wife, Elizabeth Scrope (d. 10 May 1504), the daughter of John Scrope (b. c. 1388, d. 15 November 1455), 4th Baron Scrope of Masham, Lord Treasurer of England, and his wife, Elizabeth Chaworth (d.1466?). Through his grandparents, Richard Scrope (d. 29 August 1420), 3rd Lord Scrope of Bolton, and Margaret Neville (d.1463/4), daughter of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, and Margaret Stafford (d. 9 June 1396), Robert Scrope was descended from Geoffrey Plantagenet (1113-1151), King Henry II (1133-1189) and King Edward I (1239-1307) of England. See Richardson, Douglas, Plantagenet Ancestry (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 2004), pp. 254-5, 538-1, 645, 670-3; the entry for Scrope of Masham in The Complete Peerage, p. 564-6; and the entries for Henry Scrope (c.1376-1415), 3rd Baron Scrope of Masham, and John Scrope (1437/8-1498), 5th Baron Scrope of Bolton in the online edition of The Dictionary of National Biography. Robert Scrope married Katherine Zouche by dispensation dated 9 November 1469 (see Gibbons, A., Ely Episcopal Records (Lincoln: James Williamson, 1891), p. 225, available online), and by her had four daughters: Elizabeth, the testatrix; Anne, who married Thomas Redman of Bossall; Margaret, a nun at Barking; and Agnes. The testatrix leaves bequests in the will below to her sister Anne Redman, and to Anne Redman’s daughter, Dame Anne Willestropp, and granddaughter, Eleanor Willestropp. She also leaves a bequest to her unmarried sister, Anne Scrope, and to her sister, Dame Margaret Scrope, formerly a nun at Barking. This would appear to be the same Dame Margaret Scrope mentioned in the will of Elizabeth (nee Scrope) Beaumont De Vere (d.1537), Countess of Oxford:
Item, I give & bequeath to my cousin, Dame Margaret Scrope, five pounds in money. Both the testatrix and her sister, Dame Margaret Scrope, were first cousins of the Countess.
For the Scrope pedigree, see Norcliffe, Charles Best, ed., The Visitation of Yorkshire in the Years 1563 and 1563 by William Flower, Vol. 16, (London: Harleian Society, 1881), p. 280, available online. For the Redman pedigree, see Greenwood, William, The Redmans of Levens and Harewood, (Highgate: Titus Wilson, 1905), pp. 117-19, available online. The testatrix married Sir John Peche (d.1522). The couple had no children. The testatrix’ first cousin, Margaret (nee Scrope) de la Pole (d.1515), widow of Edmund de la Pole (1472?-1513), 8th Earl of Suffolk, a claimant to the throne who was executed in 1513, lived with the testatrix and Sir John Peche (d.1522) during the last years of her life (see Harris, Barbara J., English Aristocratic Women 1450-1550 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002), p. 173, available online).

Two of the testatrix’ executors were the courtiers William Fitzwilliam (c.1490-1542), Earl of Southampton, and his stepbrother, Sir Anthony Browne (c.1500-1548). William Fitzwilliam (c.1490-1542), Earl of Southampton, was a younger son of Sir Thomas Fitzwilliam (d. 1498) of Aldwark and his wife, Lucy (d. 1534), daughter and coheir of John Neville, first Marquess Montagu, and niece of Richard Neville, earl of Warwick (the Kingmaker). Sir Anthony Browne (c.1500-1548), was the son of Sir Anthony Browne (d. 1506) and his wife, Lucy (d. 1534), widow of Sir Thomas Fitzwilliam (d.1498) of Aldwark, Yorkshire, and daughter and coheir of John Neville, Marquess Montagu. Thus, these two executors were stepbrothers, both being the sons of Lucy Neville (d.1534). The testatrix refers to Sir Anthony Browne (c.1500-1548) as her ‘cousin’. This may be because the testatrix’ mother, Elizabeth Scrope (d. 10 May 1504) was the sister of Thomas Scrope (c. 1430-1475), 5th Lord Scrope of Masham, whose son, Thomas Scrope (b. c.1459, d. 23 April 1493), 6th Lord Scrope of Masham, married Elizabeth Neville (d.1515), the sister of Lucy Neville (d.1534). For the will of Elizabeth Neville Scrope Wentworth (d.1515), mentioning her sister, Lucy Neville (d.1534), see Testamenta Eboracensia, Vol. V, pp. 50-2, available online. It is also of interest that Henry Scrope (b. c. 1373, beheaded 5 August 1415), 3rd Baron Scrope of Masham, elder brother of the testatrix’s grandfather, John Scrope (b. c. 1388, d. 15 November 1455), 4th Baron Scrope of Masham, is the Lord Scrope who is implicated in the Cambridge conspiracy in the anonymous play Sir John Oldcastle, and is the Lord Scrope of Masham who is executed for his alleged part in that conspiracy in Act II, Scene 2 of Shakespeare’s Henry V. It is also of interest that the testatrix’ relations are known to have been owners of books and manuscripts:
The children and grandchildren of Henry, Fourth Baron Scrope of Bolton and his wife, Elizabeth Scrope (a distant cousin) were avid readers and patrons of vernacular literature, especially the women. See Wada, Yoko, ed., A Companion to Ancrene Wisse (Cambridge: D.S. Brewer, 2003), p.166, available online.
For the will of the testatrix’ first cousin Elizabeth (nee Scrope) Beaumont de Vere (d.1537), Countess of Oxford, see TNA PROB 11/27, ff. 84-6. For the will of the testatrix’ first cousin Mary (nee Scrope) Jerningham Kingston (d.1548), see TNA PROB 11/32, ff. 168-9. For the will of the testatrix’ first cousin, Margaret (nee Scrope) de la Pole (d.1515), see TNA PROB 11/18, ff. 44-5. For the will of the testatrix’ husband, Sir John Peche (d.1522), see TNA PROB 11/20, ff. 200-1.
RM: Testamentum Elizabethe Peche

THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES PROB 11/30, ff. 92-3 3
In the name of God, Amen. The first day of August in the year of Our Lord God a thousand five hundred forty and one and in the 33rd year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord King Henry the Eight, I, Dame Elizabeth Peche, widow, sometime wife of Sir John Peche of Lullingstone in the county of Kent, knight, deceased, being in good, whole and perfect memory, lauded be Almighty God, make, ordain and declare this my present testament and last will in manner and form following, that is to say:
First I bequeath my soul to Almighty God, my Saviour, Maker and Redeemer, and to his Blessed Mother Saint Mary, and to all the holy company of heaven, and my body to be buried in the parish church of Lullingstone aforesaid within the tomb where the said Sir John Peche, my late husband, lieth buried;
Item, I bequeath to the high altar of the said parish church of Lullingstone ten shillings sterling;
Item, I bequeath to the high altar of the parish church of Eynsford ten shillings sterling;
Item, I bequeath to the parish church of Shoreham six shillings eight pence sterling;
Item, I will that mine executors shall cause a trental of Masses to be said within the said
parish church of Lullingstone the day of my decease if they can get so many priests, and
if they cannot, then the same to be done as soon after my decease as it conveniently may
be, and likewise I will that one other trental be said in the said church of Lullingstone at
my month’s mind;
Item, I will that mine executors give and dispose in deeds of charity amongst the poor
people next inhabiting to the said parish of Lullingstone at my burial forty shillings
sterling or more, to be distributed by the discretion of mine executors, to pray for my
soul, and likewise at my month’s mind other forty shillings or more in like manner to be
divided, distributed and dealt;
Item, I will that a priest be found to pray for my soul, my husband, Sir John Peche[‘s]
soul, our friends’ souls, and all Christian souls by the space of five years or more next
after my decease as mine executors shall think convenient to be done;
Item, I bequeath unto my singular good Lord, the Earl of Southampton, Lord Privy Seal,
two gilt bowls;
Item, I bequeath to George Harte, my godson, a gilt cup with a cover;
Item, I bequeath to every one of my gentlewomen that shall happen to wait upon me at
the time of my decease ten shillings sterling;
Item, I bequeath to every one of my menservants that shall happen to be in my service at
the time of my decease, over and above his or their wages due to them at the time of my
decease, six shillings eight pence sterling;
Item, I bequeath to my sister, Agnes Redman, a gilt salt pounced with a cover, four gilt
goblets with a cover, seven spoons with knops, the bed that I lie in wholly as it standeth,
one other bed in the chamber within the King’s great chamber as it standeth, five other
featherbeds of the meaner sort, a garnish of pewter vessel, all my kitchen stuff which I
shall leave not bequeathed in this my will, seven pair of sheets, four tablecloths, if there
be so many left, the hangings in my parlour, three chests, four coffers such as she will
choose, six cushions, two carpets, one of them long and the other short;
Item, I bequeath to my sister, Agnes Scrope, one hanging of red and green say which
hangeth in the chamber over the gate, and a white silver goblet;
Item, I bequeath to my sister, Dame Margaret Scrope, sometime a nun at Barking, five
pounds sterling;
Item, I bequeath to Agnes Goldwell, wife to James Goldwell, a gilt cup with a rose in the
top of the cover and a lion in the bottom, three silver spoons with knops, three plain
spoons, a plain silver goblet, one featherbed, a bolster, a counterpoint, one little cover
such as my sister, Anne, shall appoint, a bed of wainscot, the featherbed, the bolster, the
bed of white and green satin with the curtains and counterpoint as it standeth in the
chamber over the nursery, one brass pot, one kettle, two spits and one chafing-dish;
Item, I bequeath to Elizabeth Goldwell, daughter of the said Agnes Goldwell, a plain
goblet of silver and six pounds thirteen shillings four pence to her marriage in money or
money worth to be paid and delivered to her in the day of her marriage, and if she happen
to decease before she be married then I will that the said six pounds thirteen shillings four
pence in money or money worth shall remain to her brethren to find them to school with;
Item, I bequeath to John Goldwell, son of the said Agnes, forty shillings sterling, and to
George, her son, forty shillings sterling;
Item, I bequeath to my niece, Dame Anne Willestropp, a cross of gold with a ruby and a
diamond, and my twelve beads of gold, with a ring of gold with a little cross;
Item, I bequeath to my niece, Elizabeth Kirkeby, my ring with a flat diamond;
Item, I bequeath to Eleanor Willestropp, daughter of my said niece, Dame Anne Willestropp, my drinking cruse of silver and gilt with two ears and a cover with a scutcheon with a pomegranate;
Item, I bequeath unto each one of my maiden-servants being with me at the time of my decease ten shillings sterling;
Item, I bequeath to my chaplain, Sir John Dean, parson of Lullingstone, to pray for my
soul, one cup of silver and gilt, such one as mine executors will assign and appoint, one
white silver goblet, two gilt spoons, two cushions and a short carpet;
Item, I bequeath to John Whytwood, my steward, my cup of silver and gilt [+with?] a
lion in the top and also having a lion in the bottom of the said cup, and one white silver
goblet;
Item, I bequeath to my friend, Sir John Baker, knight, my greatest cup of silver double gilt
which I have used to lend to be borne before brides at their marriages and the covering of
the same fashioned like a standing cup, and one of my greatest standard coffers;
Item, I bequeath to my Lady Baker my plate box of silver;
Item, I bequeath to Mary Baker a pair of long small beads of jet and gold with an image
with a stone;
Item, I bequeath to Sir John Garland, priest, a featherbed and all that belongeth to it, and
two of my spoons silver with knops;
Item, I bequeath to Master Robert Johnson two gilt spoons with knops, to pray for my
soul;
Item, I bequeath to Mistress Page a goblet parcel gilt without a cover;
Item, I bequeath to Alice Sandbache a featherbed and a bolster and ten shillings in money;
The residue of all ready my [sic] money, plate, jewels, stuff of household, corn, cattle and
other my goods as well movable as unmovable whatsoever they be, over and above my
debts and funerals contented and paid, I give and bequeath to mine executors hereafter
named, they to dispose and order the same as by their discretions they shall think
expedient and convenient;
And of this my said testament and last will I make and ordain the same right honourable
and my singular good Lord the Earl of Southampton, the said Sir John Baker, my sister,
Anne Redmayne, John Whitwood, my steward, and Sir John Dean, parson of
Lullingstone, mine executors, praying the same mine executors that they will see this my
present testament performed and kept as my special trust is in them;
In witness whereof to this my present testament and last will I have set my sign the day
and year abovesaid. Elizabeth Peche. Per me Iohannem Baker. Per me Iohannem Deane
clericum. Per me John Garland, Anne Redmayne, Agnes Goldwell. Per me Alexandram
Courthopp. Per me Thomam Godfrey.
By this codicil made the 27th day of May the 36th year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord
King Henry the 8th, King of England, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, and in
earth of the Church of England and also of Ireland Supreme Head, I, Dame Elizabeth
Peche, widow, will, devise and ordain that where I, the same Dame Elizabeth, by my
testament and last will bearing date the first day of August the 33rd year of the reign of
our said Sovereign Lord have made and ordained the right honourable Lord Earl of
Southampton and late Lord Privy Seal one of mine executors, who is now deceased and
departed to Almighty God, whose soul God pardon, and by the same have bequeathed to
the same late Earl two gilt bowls, and where also I gave by the same will unto Eleanor
Willstropp, now deceased, a drinking cruse of silver and gilt with two ears and a cover
with a scutcheon with a pomegranate, and farther by the same testament gave and
bequeathed unto John Whitwood, now deceased, a cup of silver and gilt with the cover
having a lion on the top and also having a lion in the bottom, and one silver goblet, and
unto Alice Sandrach(?) a featherbed and a bolster and ten shillings in money, I will and
ordain by this present writing that as well the same my legacies and bequests as the
assignment of the said Earl to be one of my executors shall be utterly void and of none
effect, and I will, ordain and make by this my present codicil my well-beloved cousin, Sir
Anthony Browne, knight, one of mine executors in the stead and place of the said late
Earl, and do give and bequeath unto him for his pains and labours to be taken by him in
that behalf two of my gilt bowls;
Item, I give and bequeath to Agnes Goldwell one of my white silver bowls pounced;
Item, I give and bequeath unto Mistress Page one featherbed and a bolster;
And by this present codicil I ratify, affirm and confirm all other my legacies, bequests,
gifts and making and assignment of mine other executors in the same my testament made,
bequeathed, given and appointed, desiring my said cousin, Sir Anthony Browne, and
other mine executors in my said testament named to see my said testament in and by all
things performed and fulfilled as my special trust is in them. John Baker, Stephen
Keymys, Steven Dowle(?), Annes Holwell.

Probatum fuit suprascriptum Testamentum vnacum Codicillo annexo xxijdo Die mensis Iulij Anno Domini millesimo quingentesimo quadragesimo quarto Ac approbatum et insinuatum Commissaque fuit Administracio omnium et singulorum bonorum Iurium et creditorum antedictam Defunctam et eius testamentum qualitercunque concernentium Domino Anthonio Browne militi preclari ordinis Garterij militi Domino Iohanni Baker militi Agnete Redmayne et Iohanni Dean clerico Executoribus in huiusmodi testamento nominatis De bene et fideliter administrando etc Ac de Pleno et fideli Inuentario etc Necnon de plano et vero Compoto etc inde Reddendo ad sancta Dei Euangelia in Persona xpoferi Robynson notarij publici Procuratoris dictorum Executorum in hac parte Legitime constituti Iuratis

[=The above-written testament together with the codicil annexed was proved on the 22nd day of the month of July in the year of the Lord the thousand five hundred forty-fourth, and probated and entered, and administration was granted of all and singular the goods, rights and credits whatsoever concerning the aforesaid deceased and her testament to Sir Anthony Browne, knight, Knight of the noble Order of the Garter, Sir John Baker, knight, Agnes Redman and John Dean, clerk, executors named in the same testament, sworn on the Holy Gospels in the person of Christopher Robinson, notary public, proctor of the said executors in that behalf sufficiently and lawfully constituted, to well and faithfully administer etc., and [+to prepare] a full and faithful inventory etc., and also to render a plain and true account thereof.
 
Zouche, Katherine
 
3955 Awarded a pension by Henry 8 at that time. Zouche, Mary
 

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